Books do furnish a Painting by Jamie Camplin & Maria Ranauro

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton Thames and Hudson have got form for publishing tempting books that combine art and literature – Eric Karpeles’ Paintings in Proust: a visual companion to In Search of Lost Time is easily the most compelling reason I’ve ever seen for reading In Search of Lost Time (maybe one day). Books do…

The Vintage Shetland Project by Susan Crawford 

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton The Vintage Shetland Project has had quite a journey into print, one that I’ve followed with interest for the last 3 years from when I first heard about it and subscribed to the crowd funding campaign to get it published. It was 2015, I’d finally given in to the idea of…

What She Ate by Laura Shapiro

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton What She Ate looks at ‘six remarkable women and the food that tells their stories’. It comes at a time when food-centred biographies, or food books that frame themselves around biography are common, but as Shapiro points out in her introduction this is a relatively recent development. She began writing about women…

Solo: The Joy of Cooking for One by Signe Johansen

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton When I look at my collection of cookbooks it’s clear that there’s one truth that isn’t being universally acknowledged; they’re all geared towards cooking for family and friends despite the growing number of people who live alone. Despite spending most of my time cooking only for myself, I hadn’t given it…

A Round-Up of Christmas Cookbooks

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton Christmas is coming and it’s time to start talking about it. The books vying for our money, and a top ten spot, have been released – 505 of them on the 5th of October (super Thursday) alone, a good few more either side of that. The race is on. There are…

Heirloom Knitting- Sharon Miller

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton Sharon Miller’s ‘Heirloom Knitting: A Shetland Lace Pattern Book’ had become almost a book of legend before this reprint made it readily available again (or still least it cost more than I could justify to buy a second hand copy, even though I really wanted to get my hands on it),…

The Cocktail Book

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton My day job is selling wine, spirits, and beer, something I fell into when I became interested in learning more about wine. That was eighteen years ago, and I’m still only scratching the surface. One of the things that keeps the job interesting is the way that changing tastes constantly lead…

The Incredible Crime by Lois Austen-Leigh

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton The Incredible Crime and its author are something of a literary curiosity. Lois Austen-Leigh was the great great-grandniece of Jane Austen. She almost certainly wrote her books at the same desk her more famous ancestor used (now housed in the British Library), and that connection alone is probably enough to raise…

The Photographer- Meike Ziervogel 

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton I first heard of Meike Ziervogel in the early days of her publishing house, Peirene Press, when I was offered a book to review. It hooked me in and so I’ve followed what she’s done, first as a publisher, and then as a writer, ever since. The Photographer is her fourth…

Miraculous Mysteries edited by Martin Edwards 

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton Locked room murders and other similarly impossible crimes are one of the sub genres I particularly enjoy in golden age, and older, mysteries so I was particularly pleased to get my hands on a whole collection of them. Sixteen to be specific, including contributions from Dorothy L. Sayers, Arthur Conan Doyle,…

Molly Keane A Life by Sally Phipps

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton From the moment I discovered Molly Keane it was love, not just for the quality of her writing, the unflattering but compelling sharpness of her observations, or her humour, but also because she’s one of very few to have chronicled the Anglo-Irish society that was just clinging on between the wars.…