Tangerine by Christine Mangan

Reviewed by Annabel They say that in Tangier, the local hustlers have clocked all the new arrivals within hours – this is what I was told when I visited Tangier in the 1980s. Every day we stepped outside our hotel, we were met by young men eager to show us the city – via their…

A Long Way from Home by Peter Carey

Reviewed by Harriet A Long Way from Home, as the title implies, is a novel of a journey in more than one sense. An actual physical journey takes up the central portion of the book, which is divided into three related parts, but it’s also a journey to self-knowledge, with all that implies, for one…

Shiny New Books is Four!

Dear Readers, It so happened that Shiny New Books turned four-years-old in April, on the 7th to be precise, and we were all so busy we didn’t notice. When we started Shiny in April 2014, our aim was to be a quarterly magazine, with up to one hundred pages of reviews and articles each issue.…

Rex V. Edith Thompson: A Tale of Two Murders by Laura Thompson

Reviewed by Karen Langley The Thompson-Bywaters murder case (also known as “The Ilford Murder”) is notorious, but I think most of my previous knowledge of it comes from two sources: F. Tennyson Jesse’s magisterial fictional reworking of the story in A Pin to see the Peepshow; and reading about his journalistic dealings with the case…

All the Beautiful Girls by Elizabeth J Church

Reviewed by Rebecca Foster Elizabeth J. Church’s debut novel, The Atomic Weight of Love (reviewed here), was about an 87-year-old amateur ornithologist whose husband was one of the creators of the atomic bomb. I could see some of its themes – the difficulty of a woman choosing her own path and making it fit into…

Rosie: Scenes from a Vanished Life by Rose Tremain

Reviewed by Harriet I’m a huge admirer of Rose Tremain’s brilliant novels, and very fond of childhood memoirs as a genre, so this one was a must for me. It’s the story of growing up in a world that might seem comfortable and privileged, but one with many uncomfortable spikes under its apparently smooth surface.…

The Vintage Shetland Project by Susan Crawford 

Reviewed by Hayley Anderton The Vintage Shetland Project has had quite a journey into print, one that I’ve followed with interest for the last 3 years from when I first heard about it and subscribed to the crowd funding campaign to get it published. It was 2015, I’d finally given in to the idea of…

The Unbeliever by Oggy Boytchev

Reviewed by Annabel We’re delighted to be the final stop on the short blog tour to celebrate the publication of this book. Oggy (Ognian) Boytchev grew up behind the Iron Curtain in Bulgaria. He developed an interest in spies and spy novels as a child, after hearing propaganda on the radio of a convicted spy’s…

Dear Mrs Bird by A J Pearce

Reviewed by Helen Skinner It’s 1941 and Britain is at war. Emmeline Lake has always wanted to be a journalist and is thrilled when she sees an advertisement in the newspaper for a job at the London Evening Chronicle. This could be her opportunity to become a Lady War Correspondent. How exciting! To her delight, Emmy…

How Shostakovich Changed My Mind by Stephen Johnson

Reviewed by Karen Langley Readers of Shiny New Books will know of my love for Notting Hill Editions books; I’ve reviewed their Beautiful and Impossible Things and The Russian Soul volumes, and so the promise of a new book covering the impact of Russian composer Dimitri Shostakovich’s music on author Stephen Johnson was impossible to resist.…

Interview with Amanda Berriman, author of Home

Interview by Lucy Unwin Lucy: Thank you for taking the time to talk to us, could you explain a little bit about your original aim with Home? Amanda: I was trying to explore what ‘home’ is to different people and how it can look one way, but be something else. With the comparisons between Jesika…

To Be a Machine by Mark O’Connell (pbk)

Reviewed by Annabel Already shortlisted last year for the Baillie Gifford and Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prizes, Mark O’Connell’s book, now available in paperback, has also been shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize 2018, which will be announced at the end of the month. This prize celebrates, ‘the many ways in which literature can…